1

fun

2

tech

3

PBL

4

confidence

5

place

6

motivate

7

tech prob

8

culture

1. What five things (or more?) did you learn in today's experience?

               

1 Idra: never leave tent at camp, bring a poncho, check pack for water bottle before jumping to conclusions that it's lost,

       

5

   

8

1 Fred: beauty, game takes a while, fml is a good place to be

         

6

   

1 Mark: gave me a reason for doing things: "we gotta go there for John!"...Something about the ancient trail with the GPS unit

 

2

 

4, 4

5

     

1 Earl: how to work a GPS better, not much. lots of blueberries. bushwhacking is actually really cool, because when you're playing the game ... you don't have to follow the path, when you're on the water, the GPS tells you how far you're going. (GOOD PART!) it'll be how fast are we going? you learn more about hiking, and about yourself, how fast you hike, etc. well you can measure how fast you're going up too

               

1 Doug: raspberries are good, bushes are thorny, trust a compass. Brad did the marking of waypoints

 

2

           

1 Jack: how to use the GPS, Mitchville is hard to find. We might not have found it. How to find the PPC

1

2

3

 

5

     

1 Brad: it involves a lot of bushwhacking, figuring out how the kids would take it. but it was fun. always trust the compass. The compass does not lie. The GPS I wasn't sure how into it I was going to get, but it was cool. Mapping out new stuff. That was pretty cool. And trying to see "oh how far does that look on the GPS" and what orientation we are, and how far we're going, and the speed "we're going 3 mph guys!" and having the earlier trip's waypoints and seeing if it would match up.

       

5

     

1 Hank: I think it's a neat game and all. It proves that electronics can be used in the outdoors for fun too. I found that a lot the places hadn't been used for a long time and they had to be marked -- I thought that everyplace was already basically explored, but it turns out that there's a lot of things that are hidden, that you didn't know about. And I figured out that a lot of the trails were overgrown. that people hadn't been cleaning them at all. and I found that.

 

2

           

1 Levi: how to clear trails, quality trees vs. trash trees, dead leaves and branches, how the GPS and game can be combined, more about backpacking, food partners, etc.

       

5

   

8

1 Amos: the game idea, fire pit not in dip (cuz of water), shade in campsites, be patient with self (injured hand), learned a lot about the area. I didn't know about Flying Moose Mountain until this trip. And I saw some areas I've never seen before.

   

3

 

5

   

8

1 Quinn: The older kids aren't sometimes the best campers (bossy). I enjoyed making the campsite. It was interesting. Making trails was harder than I thought. Figuring out which way to go, and sort of paving the way, etc.

 

2

3

 

5

   

8

1 Kris: about AR tech, creating a game outside, [oh such BS answers!]. I enjoyed the wilderness, pack to be prepared ... I learned to respect it more, leave as little trace as possible. It was fun to create the new campsite

       

5

     

1 Carl: Not much. There are lots of blueberries on Flying Moose Mountain. Mitchville campsite has a porcupine in it. Hothole Brook isn't good for drinking, the Great Pond mountain hike isn't that tough (getting easier), there's a mouse at the Stevenson campsite.

1

5

5

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2. What technology did you use?

             

8

2 Idra: I didn't use it. Fred had it most of the day. He felt he had to stop and make routes (waypoints)

 

2

           

2 Fred: gps, ppc, game in manual mode,

   

3

4

       

2 Mark: I didn't use anything. I was comfortable it was working. I mean I tried out the game one night. I let Fred have the white GPS... It would be frustrating if we messed it up in some way. The design of the game is very important. It does have to lead you around.

 

2

           

2 Earl: nifty little palm pilot here. The game is really fun in manual mode...

           

7

 

2 Doug: I didn't understand how to use the game in manual mode -- especially with the triggers not working

 

2

           

2 Jack: PPC and GPS

 

2

3

 

5

     

2 Brad: ppc, gps, and the area we were in had not been visited. We marked it all in. flag hill and all that

 

2

3

     

7

8

2 Hank: read the game out loud. ... the ppc was new to everyone, we were trying to figure it out together (broken triggers)

 

2

           

2 Levi: GPS, Pocket PC,

 

2

           

2 Amos: GPS, saw the game

 

2

           

2 Quinn: gps, gps, pocket PC

 

2

           

2 Kris: GPS, PPC, a notebook would've been cooler

 

2

           

2 Carl: the white GPS

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3. How did the technology assist with your experiences today?

               

3 Idra: It didn't really, because there weren't really any trails on it, so we just used the map. I mean it would tell us where we were, but we mostly knew where we were.

1

2

3

         

3 Fred: I could see the map, and if I went somewhere wrong I could just backtrack...fun using technology

               

3 Mark: ---

 

2

3

   

6

 

8

3 Earl: we were thinking about assisting other people, making waypoints, etc. gave a goal or purpose. the gps, it really does get rid of those questions "are we there yet" etc. that the counselor's despise. It even has a clock on it, so you can't ask "what time is it?"

         

6

   

3 Doug: trust the compass over your own feeling of what's right ... on a regular trip you just want to get to the next campsite, but on this you have to get to this mountain to stop the radio signals then you have to go to this one and that one, but on a trip that'd just be to get to the next campsite This was more do it so you can do something in the game, so you could finish the game and see what happens next.

1

2

           

3 Jack: the gps helped because find our way around and mark places, which was pretty cool, and the PC was helpful because we could find our way around to things, and the game was just fun in general.

 

2

 

4

5

6

   

3 Brad: It was helpful when bushwhacking on Great Pond Mountain. It was a reassuring addition to having the map and compass. and also allows you to be a bit more adventurous .. if you get lost, you can just follow the GPS route back.

1

2

   

5

6

   

3 Hank: the whole point was to test the PC, and it was really neat. It encouraged us to do things because it was interesting to get to the different points and see what happens in the game. Like we had to climb three peaks and intercept signals, so it was neat to find out what the signals would be, so it encourages you to hike even though you can't make it up to the top of Flying Moose mountain [because it doesn't' have a peak]

 

2

     

6

   

3 Levi: the GPS messages in the game make you want to go further as if it were a real life situation. [Compared to] In a regular hiking trip it's like "yeah, we're gonna climb this mountain" but in the game it's like "Yeah, we HAVE TO climb up the mountain to get this done!" Do you think that added to the experience? yeah definitely. If you're going to speed up for no reason, it wouldn't be fun, but with this it's part of the game. It's fun.

1

2

 

4

5

6

   

3 Amos: It helped us from getting lost and it helped map out the area better. It's cool with the game that we can have Chris radioing in to say "you can't go there" so you better go over here, and you couldn't do that like 10-20 years ago.

1

2

 

4

5

     

3 Quinn: it made the game possible, and it helped us find the campsite (Mitchville), and we found other trails and found the way up Flying Moose Mountain [peak]. I remember sometimes thinking that if we didn't have the GPS we'd be lost. [maps for that area aren't very detailed.]

               

3 Kris: --

 

2

           

3 Carl: it made it easier to find the trails and see where you're going. It tracks and tells us where we've gone, and how to get back if we need to backtrack

5

9

2

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6

0

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culture

4. Did you have any problems? How were you able to work around them?

 

2

       

7

 

4 Idra: No.

               

4 Fred: The gps died, newer one [Magellan] is perfect

               

4 Mark: ---

       

5

     

4 Earl: The dead river thing, we thought it would curve around great pond, but it ended in a swamp.

               

4 Doug: --

           

7

 

4 Jack: One or two communications that we couldn't find (bad triggers).

           

7

 

4 Brad: Well, the battery died. The game didn't trigger right. There were some game quirks, but it was still playable [in manual mode]. It wasn't that bad

           

7

 

4 Hank: We did the whole game backwards, and just went where it told us to, but in a different order. [due to manual mode] some places weren't marked ,and we got to mark them.

           

7

 

4 Levi: Since the PPC battery died immediately (button pressed on in waterproof case) we worked on improving the game by making a nice campsite (Mitchville), and clearing some trails (other groups complained about)

           

7

 

4 Amos: The battery died so we just improvised around it. No real problems -- my hand [stung by a bee].

           

7

 

4 Quinn: The PPC battery we went through it in the beginning, so we knew what we were doing, but

             

8

4 Kris: Working on the Stevenson site [group conflict]

               

4 Carl: Not really. It was pretty easy. I didn't have a Leatherman so I had to ask for it. It would've been harder if we hiked forever, or had to do more trail work.

0

1

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culture

5. How did the GPS affect the way you saw the land?

               

5 Idra: (nodding no) no because I didn't use it.

     

4

 

6

   

5 Fred: Not really, but what did was it seemed so far, but it just keeps going down. It seemed like so far, but 5 minutes later we're halfway there.

1

             

5 Mark: Personally, I ignore the GPS, much happier with the map. I avoid the GPS in my other job [traditionalist]. My rigid nature -- I'd get hung up at making waypoints at each juncture. I'd get sucked into the completeness of it all. and the taxonomy of naming things....So the rest of the group, um -- I don't feel like we were led around by the GPS. It felt like a normal trip. Earl had talked about the GPS answering all the questions like "where are we, how far have we gone, etc."... that's true, they didn't ask those questions. They did on the first day, when we didn't have the GPS.

     

4

 

6

   

5 Earl: It made it look easier too, because when you're looking a the GPS unit, and you look into the distance you're thinking, "wow that's not too far, or that's a lot further..." "We really took that mountain down, but then you see it on the GPs, and it's only one mile."

1

     

5

     

5 Doug: Knowing the height [altitude] was good, and we had some fun with the speed -- trying to go faster

       

5

 

7

 

5 Jack: Sort of -- because it helped us find places, (altitude) one bad part was that the GPS good one ran out of battery, and the blue one didn't have anything marked. The first day he did map and compass.

     

4

5

     

5 Brad: It gave you confidence. It liberated you. It's a different experience than Baxter [Park], where the trail's there, and there's no real way to get off of it, and everything's all marked out, and this way it's like "well, you know, it should be about a mile this way..."

               

5 Hank: It [the GPS] would have been better if it had maps.

     

4

5

     

5 Levi: You could actually see where you were, and what direction you were headed. You can't tell exactly where you are though [on a map]

       

5

     

5 Amos: It showed how close we are to things. Like I thought we were far away from Flying Moose Mountain. I thought Great Pond was the center of these mountains.

     

4

       

5 Quinn: Sort of -- it made it different -- in that you ... it was easier -- I don't know.

1

   

4

5

6

   

5 Kris: We knew where we were and how fast we'd get to the next spot. I enjoyed that. It's a hassle to not know where you are -- convenience too. It's more portable [than a map].

     

4

5

     

5 Carl: It helped see where we were going, and the distances. It gives you more of an idea of where you are, more than a map. You know you are on a map, but you can't really pinpoint it as well. On the GPS you know more exact, you have a better idea of how far you have to go. It could hinder it if you were hiking and you thought you were further than you actually were, so you're going on that confidence that it's closer than it is, so knowing that it was farther would be an annoyance. Whereas if you were closer as well, if you thought you had 2 miles to go, and you only had to go one mile...

2

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7

7

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confidence

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6. What did you learn about the land that you might not have learned without the GPS?

               

6 Idra: --

     

4

5

     

6 Fred: There are many ways to get somewhere. Distance is skewed. In bushwhacking -- you don't really know where you are on a map, but with a GPS you can see.

               

6 Mark: --

               

6 Earl: (already answered)

               

6 Doug: --

     

4

5

6

   

6 Jack: The altitude, definitely, like how high we were, and uh, we probably wouldn't have found our way back too well. 'Cuz we had to do a lot of bushwhacking. When we don't have it, unless you have a map and compass, it's like aimlessly walking. If we have the GPS it's like you're actually trying to go somewhere. Like we're actually know the direction we're going, like how high we need to go, and how high we are. You have a basic general sense of where you are.

     

4

5

     

6 Brad: There's a lot of logging that went on back there and actually the new growth is the toughest stuff. Trees that have been there for just 5 -10 years are pretty brutal to go through actually -- so thick, and dense [and if not for the GPS they'd not have gone there]

       

5

     

6 Hank: --

     

4

5

     

6 Levi: You could see how the trails curved along. They aren't really straight lines.

     

4

       

6 Amos: You can see where the skidder trails went. If we didn't' have it I'm pretty sure we'd have gotten lost. Gave us confidence to check them out.

       

5

     

6 Quinn: There are a lot of trails, and no bowling alley [inside FML joke], some trails are made before you know.

       

5

     

6 Kris: I learned about the area around FML: the logging, development threat, the new preserve, etc.

1

   

4

5

     

6 Carl: I'm not sure. The maps gave me a pretty good idea where everything was. The GPS made it more enjoyable with the tracking of our path and seeing where we were. You're less likely to get lost with the GPS. When you're bushwhacking the GPS tracks your movement better.

1

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fun

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tech

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culture

7. How did the game project affect the way you saw the land?

   

3

 

5

     

7 Idra: I was always thinking about how we could turn the land, like using it in the game, like when we saw the saw the hunter's towers I knew we could use those in the game, and the blueberry patches -- several times I picked like 40 blueberries, put them all in my hand and like shoved them into my mouth. and that could be in the game how? Maybe there could be a blueberry monster? I was joking around with that, but with the hunter towers things we can.

1

 

3

 

5

     

7 Fred: I thought about what could be hidden here, what could happen here, etc. It was fun, because we did it for John. Although we got more tired the second day (with the GPS)

   

3

 

5

     

7 Mark: The idea that are certain spots that are kind of special. We had an idea that some point in the lake would be important. The lake I think would be less frustrating than a random point in the woods. You're definitely looking for things that would be special.

       

5

     

7 Earl: Not much. It changed our perception of close and far, but didn't change what we did water jug -- how to use it

               

7 Doug: I mostly used the map.

     

4

 

6

   

7 Jack: The game took us to different places that we might not have gone without it. Like, we went down to Hothole [pond], without it we might not have explored as much. We had to find the sniper towers that were marked. (saw things as being part of the game)

1

       

6

   

7 Brad: It was more fun to have a goal, instead of "let's just climb this mountain" we have to get the radio signals. And we'd want to know what's john martin going to say? It was a shame that I didn't do it in order, but we got the gist of it. And the kids were definitely into it. They enjoyed it.

1

       

6

   

7 Hank: We had to bushwhack more. We were supposed to avoid the sniper towers, but we did it backwards. We'd joke about the plot of the game,

     

4

5

6

   

7 Levi: Um... It made it so it wasn't like you were scraped by the bushes for no reason. It was a safe way up the mountain. [reframing the bad parts into part of the game narrative made it fun]

       

5

     

7 Amos: It was the same with GPS, bushwhacking and stuff.

         

6

   

7 Quinn: It was more interesting. You felt more pressed to get to the next campsite. there was more to the next place than "oh, let's do this..."

         

6

   

7 Kris: The game was a motivational tool [this is good] it gave you a reason to go, rather than just "to enjoy" -- especially good for younger campers.

         

6

   

7 Carl: In my opinion, since I'm 15, the game seemed a bit silly, but I guess it might be fun if you were 11 or so because it makes it seem more adventurous because you're actually doing something. They can put it in their mind like it's actually happening.

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8

culture

8. What did you learn about the land that you might not have learned without the game project?

               

8 Idra: --

               

8 Fred: I don't know.

               

8 Mark: --

               

8 Earl: --

   

3

         

8 Doug: We couldn't do some of the things we normally would do, so we had to come up with other ways of doing them. (follow stream)

       

5

     

8 Jack: Seeing your altitude, where we actually were, or what we were supposed to be doing

   

3

 

5

     

8 Brad: (the narrative) I gained more respect for the people who first came out here and forged new trails. Mapping out new areas. It's pretty intense. Especially back in the day when GPS wasn't an option

               

8 Hank:--

1

     

5

6

   

8 Levi: It was more exciting because ... bushwhacking without a GPS, you're like "where are we?" You're not really sure. But when you have the GPS, it's like "Oh we're right here, and we just have to go a little further"

       

5

     

8 Amos: We found Mitchville. The game helped me know the point I had to go to, familiarizing me with the land

1

     

5

6

   

8 Quinn: Bushwhacking is really hard, and you should never do it in flip-flops. I never bushwhacked before. Last Wildlands trip was more relaxed because we didn't have the GPS or game, and we didn't find Mitchville. We didn't move as much then. We just went there and went up to Mead [Mountain] and Great Pond [Mountain], and went around there. We didn't got to Flying Moose mountain. Going to Flying Moose mountain was fun because I'm a Mooser.

       

5

6

   

8 Kris: I learned the names of mountains. The game motivated me to get up to these peaks. It took me up Flying Moose Mountain [camp namesake]. ... There could be a game about Flying Moose as a species.

               

8 Carl: --

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9. How did the GPS affect the way you saw others on your trip?

 

2

     

6

   

9 Idra: Fred was a little obsessed with it. He kept on stopping and sitting down, and saying "come on guys! I gotta get the routes! I gotta get the routes! Come on guys let's stop!"

               

9 Fred: It didn't really.

   

3

   

6

   

9 Mark: It was another aspect of them, beyond the role of them as a camper. It changed their level of interest. The attention for that project -- it's a different kind of attention. It's a whole different skill. And you've got writing skills, and knowing what's funny and stuff like that.

               

9 Earl: It could have gone a little better. We lost the PDA at the fish hatchery

               

9 Doug: --

1

2

 

4

     

8

9 Jack: I wasn't the main person using it, Brad knew how, and he taught it to us. Everyone showed interest, but I couldn't tell whether everyone got it. I certainly got it.

       

5

     

9 Brad: We went slower and it was a lot more tiring. I was sort of taken aback at the attitude of the campers toward bushwhacking. They were not interested in bushwhacking at the end of the trip. [needs less bushwhacking]. The trails need trimming. I gained an appreciation for nice trails.

               

9 Hank: --

               

9 Levi: You're more reliant on the GPS, whereas on a trip you're more reliant on the kids to read the map right.

               

9 Amos: --

               

9 Quinn: It didn't really.

               

9 Kris: None.

               

9 Carl: Didn't. Don't correlate navigation to the people who use the technology

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10. How did the game project affect the way you saw others on the trip?

   

3

         

10 Idra: Not at all. I mean everyone had ideas really, but it didn't really affect it.

   

3

       

8

10 Fred: Mostly Mark... we did a lot of the ideas, he tied our ideas together into the story and plot -- details. etc.

               

10 Mark: --

               

10 Earl: --

   

3

       

8

10 Doug: There was more teamwork, like when we had discussions about directions and you'd think we had to go one way, and they said, no, the other way, and then they'd show you on the map.

               

10 Jack: --

               

10 Brad: --

               

10 Hank: --

               

10 Levi: It makes a difference on how into it you are. If you're more into it, you want to climb all the mountains and do the bushwhacking. If you're not, it's like "Aw, I don't want to do this; we don't need to."

               

10 Amos: --

               

10 Quinn: It didn't really.

               

10 Kris: --

               

10 Carl: About the same as GPS -- not much

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11. What did you learn about Flying Moose Lodge, or being a camper at FML today?

               

11 Idra: --

 

2

 

4

5

6

   

11 Fred: When I get back home, I have a game that Mom said I could buy... but now probably I'll do a hike or something. ... All around you is stuff that was here before...

             

8

11 Mark: Robin Hooders were the subject of conversation a lot. The identity of the camp is important, and they want that reflected in the game. And your game that had all the song lyrics and stuff in them -- that was fantastic, and meaningful to them

 

2

           

11 Earl: It's changing. We've got GPS. it's changing for the better. GPS is good technology. the Game? I think they're going to be great! And that's just going to make it better.

   

3

   

6

 

8

11 Doug: We don't like Robin Hood. We have courage. We take things. Like I kept saying to myself "Power Through" when we wee going through big thorny bushes, to just power through it. Keep going. Other camps might take pity a bit more. Instead of saying we gotta get there and just suck it up, they might stop and I don't know,

 

2

           

11 Jack: You can use a small amount of technology. I learned before that FML was a low-tech camp, and it's changing. (is it bad?) No, because it's not plug-in, and it uses batteries. It's not high tech.

       

5

     

11 Brad: There's a lot right here at Craig Pond, right around camp, and I never thought of that before. There's a lot to do out here, and it's a really cool area. I underestimated East Orland a little bit.

     

4

 

6

 

8

11 Hank: We do more things that just hiking and canoeing, and it was another thing to test our skills, and it was kind of neat. Imagination -- some people might think it was stupid. They might not have an imagination for it but we had a fun time thinking about the plot of it and all. We went 20 miles today! It's supposed to be more adventurous.

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11 Levi: You can actually use technology camping. It shows that we're getting a little bit more modern. Maybe a little bit more expensive. It makes you think that these trips are supposed to be for fun rather than like "Yeah we're gonna hike!"

     

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11 Amos: We like the area -- Flying Moose Mountain. The camp relies on the area around it, and that's what makes it successful. And we have a work ethic [referring to the campsite they made], trying your best, working hard, sense of accomplishment. From where we started out from I had some doubts, I thought "oh man, we'll be lucky if we get even one good tent site!" It didn't turn out that way and I slept pretty well. We have a nice fire pit.

             

8

11 Quinn: Why it's called Flying Moose Lodge.

             

8

11 Kris: The history of FML (Flying Moose Mountain connection)

     

4

 

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11 Carl: A lot. I've learned that you can have a really good time out in the woods. You learn a lot about the wilderness and where you are. And I've learned more about myself. I can actually push myself harder than I thought I could. I have more confidence I what I could do.

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<<< Thematic utterances

 


 

1

fun

2

tech

3

PBL

4

confidence

5

place

6

motivate

7

tech prob

8

culture

12. How did the technology, or game project, play into that learning?

               

12 Idra: --

 

2

           

12 Fred: It [not having a map on the GPS] completely showed me that you mark what you think is cool. You have to draw your own map.

 

2

           

12 Mark: Technology and FML -- I'm not sure. They were playing Jawbreaker on your PPC. I told them not to, but I know it was going on.

   

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(later) Earl: Well you're playing a game, but you're also hiking in the wilderness, and the wilderness has a lot to offer... the game gives you a task/goals.

 

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12 Doug: we lost the trail hiking up Mead Mountain, so it helped a lot. It made things easier.

               

12 Jack: --

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12 Brad: It allowed me to go a lot further and worry less about official campsites and marked trails, so I got to know the area a lot better than I probably would have. The GPS helped with that, but I would have had a pretty good experience with just the map and compass. The game project was just an additional spur to go on to new places. Like when it said "Go to the top of Great Pond Mountain, but stay off the trail because they're watching them" -- had that not been a part of it we almost certainly would have just gone up the regular trail. It was cool because we went up the stream, and had to navigate from point A to point B, and we bumped into the trail near the top, and said "Oh! we shouldn't take it!" They were into it! I like that.

               

12 Hank: --

               

12 Levi: --

         

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12 Amos: Not much, but it would keep younger kids more focused. It would help me keep focused if I was younger.

       

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12 Quinn: We found the campsite

               

12 Kris: The game led to Flying Moose Mountain

     

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12 Carl: I'm not sure. It might give me more confidence to do things where I might get lost with the map.

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<<< Thematic utterances

 


 

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fun

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tech

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PBL

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confidence

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place

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motivate

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tech prob

8

culture

13. Do you think this project (the GPS and/or the game) is worth continuing, or not?

               

13 Idra: --

1

             

13 Fred: Yes, they wouldn't be thinking about how long they were going, or how boring, but it'd be fun, for the game.

   

2

         

13 Mark: I think it is worth continuing, but I you need a good game that Earl lead them.

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13 Earl: I do. It's enjoyable, and worth it. People Earl get into it. You get to hike. You learn more about technology. You can offer numbers [mileage, altitude, speed, etc.] to your hiking stories.

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13 Doug: Yeah I do -- it made it really fun. On other trips it's more "get through it" and notice the things around you, but for this it was that and there was a story behind it more. example: I wouldn't have normally bushwhacked at all, but I noticed raspberries. I've never really tried a raspberry before. I think it can be a lot bigger and get better.

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13 Jack: Definitely. It was pretty fun to start off with, and you can make it better it was fun to play around with, and it's just getting started (ideas?) I don't know (noncommittal)

1

             

13 Brad: Without question. I'd do it again next year. I think there's a lot of potential, and the game itself is very open to a lot of different projects, like Mark's group came up with that whole story and that was really good. That was pretty impressive, I don't know if I could top this...

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13 Hank: It definitely was fun, because it took imagination to think about what was going on in the game.

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13 Levi: Yeah, it seems like with the technology -- it's more reliable [than maps], and it would be fun for little kids (9-12yo), (what would have to happen to the game to extend it to 14 year old?) Add a big prize or something. Make it more of a treasure hunt where you follow clues, rather than an actual scenario where you do this to escape the Robin Hooders. The corny aspect of it [wasn't great], the bigger kids probably wouldn't follow it as much. It'd still be fun for little kids.

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13 Amos: Yes! It's just another way of doing things. It's just more fun. We're so used to technology now that it can be used for things -- old things -- that have always been there, like this land, and nature. They can mix together and make fun things like this, and the GPS, and can be used to map out the area and really help kids enjoy the outdoors. It's just a new way of thinking, going around and pretending -- using your imagination that the camp's been taken over and you have to get away from the evil Robin Hooders. It kept me going.

           

7

 

13 Quinn: Yeah. Get the PPC to work better. And it'd be better to not know what's going to happen next in the game.

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13 Kris: Definitely, with a few modifications. The trip enjoyed it. Maybe make it on a laptop. Find more items. Work with others who live in the area.

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13 Carl: I think the game is worth continuing, even at other places, like Baxter, with younger kids. The GPS might be enjoyable as itself for the older kids as well, because you can do a bit more without worrying about getting lost really.

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<<< Thematic utterances

 

1

fun

2

tech

3

PBL

4

confidence

5

place

6

motivate

7

tech prob

8

culture

Other questions:

 

What happened?

             

8

Idra: First we canoed to your dock, then hiked up the ancient trail, then bushwhacked, and swam for 45 minutes, then today it rained a lot, and down poured. Did it give you something to talk about? Yeah, a little bit, like Fred plays D&D.

 

What happened in the game called "Mitchville: where the War Began"

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Idra: Actually, mostly Mark did. What we did was over the days came up with ideas, and then last night he just wrote them all together into a story. And then this morning we all read it and all liked it. Do you like it?

 

So what idea was yours? I see that the hunters platforms become snipers.

   

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Idra: we had thought first tat you had to track the Flying Moose, and one of the hunters had seen the Flying Moose, or heard of it where it was, but he would shoot you if you didn't have an orange vest, so you had to go to the other one to get an orange vest

 

How did you know which one to go to?

               

Idra: He would tell you.

 

So what did you think of the experience?

1

             

Idra: It was cool.

 

Good trip?

               

Idra: yeah. Except the first day. [b/c of the heavy rain]

 

You guys hiked a lot

 

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Idra: eight miles with loaded packs. [The GPS] didn't make it worse or better because we hadn't collected enough waypoints to make it easier yet. Yesterday it helped a little bit because then we knew like where Great Pond Mountain trail was.

 

Are you still interested in this game or not?

         

6

   

Idra: yes! I'm interested in it!

 

So this weekend we might make it into an actual game

         

6

   

Idra: Yayyyy!

 

Do you want to be one of the characters?

         

6

   

Idra: Sure! Yeah!

 

You could be John Martin?

               

Idra: [nods "no"]

 

You could be the evil person giving the message transmission.

   

3

         

Idra: My cousin could be good at that. He has the best screen voice. Cuz his voice sounds like really spooky when transmitted by the computer, cuz he's like a programmer ... it's not garbled by the computer. It's just natural, you know how some people's voices when recorded sound different naturally depending on their voice? His voice sounds creepy and spooky....

 

Any other thoughts?

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Fred: It's an awesome idea...

               

Fred's ideas on game iterations (good!)

 

Did the kids learn anything a bout designing the game?

   

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Mark: We talked about individual ideas and connections between things, but really interconnecting everything is a bit challenging to do while hiking. But individual puzzles they could definitely think of. All you need is to was just suggest a site, and they'll think of what to put there. They had a great idea this morning about the viewpoint up here, where you could see stuff that was going on. They'd read the run-through of the capture thing, and from up there you can see Great Pond mountain real well and your cabin, so the idea that you'd be up there while the people taking over the camp were around, so the GPS [ppc] would give you an enhanced view of what was going on over there. You'd see men running around wearing all black, some standing outside your cabin looking threatening. And you could really, I think. imagine it, because you can't see things clearly enough to actually see anything, so it'd be showing a picture of what you were looking at.

 

So, did any of them surprise you with that?

         

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Mark: I'm not sure. They definitely had an understanding of the game. So, what aspects of other games would translate into this one. They definitely had an understanding of that. But nobody would really sit down and do it. I had to drive them. They seemed quite happy to talk about it, but documenting it is a whole different thing. And they can have ideas, but there's not a real desire to record them, or even have them beyond that moment. And there's no great ownership of that idea. Or a desire to see it in the game.

 

If there was already a game sketched out, that would be different? They would tweak it?

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Mark: Yeah. Now that we've found that structure that has a path to it, and a basic story and solution to it, and it's really easy to add either tasks that are unrelated to the main story, or break that up more, and I think that would be really fun to have an idea that fit into that framework.

 

(conversation with Idra and Peter, who didn't want to be interviewed. So I can't use this.)

               

Peter: It can be improved. Use the map first, then give them the GPS. or the other way around. It takes longer to make waypoints. Bushwhacking was Mark's knowledge.

               

Mark: says Peter did a great job on Tuesday. Our campers chose not to bring the tent. The game was fun to play, but it just needs more. Over a couple of days.

 

If you came back as a counselor, and there were a bunch of games. Is this something you'd want to revise the game and update it?

               

Earl: yeah. I'd make a new game. Keep the old games as options. I think a canoeing GPS would be really good!

 

Did you come up with any ideas for the game?

               

Doug: It was hard -- the triggers didn't work.

 

Got any ideas to change the game?

               

Doug: --anti triggers, and sounds

 

So we put you through a lot here?

               

Doug: yeah

 

Is that ok?

1

             

Doug: yeah, I think it's fun.

 

Did you take any notes?

               

Jack: Brad wrote it down, but he's on the Gash.

 

Do you have any ideas?

       

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Brad: I'd have to know the area better, but I think there's a lot of opportunity for -- I don't know how people would feel about working around the private property, but there's a lot of mountains out in the Wildlands, and a lot of wild terrain and things to explore.

 

Any strategies to slow down the game?

   

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Brad: Like give you some options, like we need these things done during the day or something and you have more time to plan out your own trip. Like there's some problems and several solutions and you choose which path to take to take you on. Just give more scope for the player's input. Add more options to the game strategy A or B -- which is better for the game -- let the players choose options. There is a lot of potential with that model and with the land we have around here. And it's equally adaptable t a lot of other places.

 

Do you have any motivational ideas?

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Brad: They were motivated already -- I think it works well at FML b/c we have all this material to go with it. Everyone's already bought into, oh you know, Robin Hood is bad, and stuff like that. We all have a sort of common culture. Like, we know the characters, so it's funny when Addie is fighting eight people at once, and stuff like that. Your audience is not random. They share in the idea of the camp.

               

Brad: (discussion of game limitations)

 

What did you guys do?

         

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Hank: we followed the orders that the game gives us. to given points to fulfill the things that it says.

 

How did that differ from a regular trip?

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Hank: you actually have imagination because it says things that are going on that aren't really going on, so it's just kind of neat like that. So you can imagine what's happening in the game instead of just hiking.

 

Did having the game enhance or take away form the trip?

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Quinn: it took away b/c we couldn't do whatever we wanted, but it enhanced it in that it was a game and it was more fun. and having the GPS was kind of cool.

 

Did it take away from enjoyment of hiking??

               

Kris: this is task-driven, and bad

 

How can we modify than game to not take away from the relaxed moving of hiking

               

Kris: collect wildlife sightings, make the game less panic-based?

 

Is there anyway to make it appeal to an older group?

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Carl: I don't know, it seems childish. I could have fun with it, but I think older kids would make jokes about it, like how silly it was, but younger kids would have more fun with it.

 

What would it take, what storyline, to appeal to an older kid?

   

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Carl: I really can't think of any. Usually my experience, as I got older, pretending, so the game isn't as much fun. It just seems kind of silly. Maybe if it's more competitive more of an actual game, more serious, not like it's pretending. If it were more serious like you're actually doing something. like a race to get more stuff. that would've been more fun.

 

How was Flying Moose Mountain?

         

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Carl: I was proud to go up to the top of the mountain that the camp was named after.

 

Does having the GPS help you connect to the land at all?

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Carl: not really. I guess you could go deeper into the woods, without as much worrying, and seeing some of the more natural stuff off the trail. And it's also cool, like on a stationary trip, because it's cool to watch your movement and progressing along in an area, and seeing how far you've gone because on a map it sometimes doesn't look as impressive. Also you feel a bit more confident about taking less used routes or smaller routes.

 

How about a game a Donnel pond? or Tunk Lake, or some other stationary trip?

               

Carl: The game would be more suited for a stationary trip, more than the mobile trips

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<<< Thematic utterances

Thematic weight of interviews

fun

tech

PBL

confidence

place

motivate

tech prob

culture

Questions:

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1. What five things (or more?) did you learn in today's experience?

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2. What technology did you use?

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3. How did the technology assist with your experiences today?

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4. Did you have any problems? How were you able to work around them?

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5. How did the GPS affect the way you saw the land?

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6. What did you learn about the land that you might not have learned without the GPS?

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7. How did the game project affect the way you saw the land?

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8. What did you learn about the land that you might not have learned without the game project?

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9. How did the GPS affect the way you saw others on your trip?

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10. How did the game project affect the way you saw others on the trip?

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11. What did you learn about Flying Moose Lodge, or being a camper at FML today?

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12. How did the technology, or game project, play into that learning?

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13. Do you think this project (the GPS and/or the game) is worth continuing, or not?

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Follow-up questions (mostly "Why" or "Give an Example" questions)

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Sum of thematic utterances